Today In History, Feb. 23: Iwo Jima

Today is Friday, Feb. 23.

Today’s Highlight in History:

In 1836, the siege of the Alamo began in San Antonio, Texas.

In 1848, the sixth president of the United States, John Quincy Adams, died in Washington D.C., at age 80.

In 1934, Leopold III succeeded his late father, Albert I, as King of the Belgians.

In 1942, the first shelling of the U.S. mainland during World War II occurred as a Japanese submarine fired on an oil refinery near Santa Barbara, California, causing little damage.

In 1954, the first mass inoculation of schoolchildren against polio using the Salk vaccine began in Pittsburgh as some 5,000 students were vaccinated.

In 1965, film comedian Stan Laurel, 74, died in Santa Monica, California.

In 1981, an attempted coup began in Spain as 200 members of the Civil Guard invaded Parliament, taking lawmakers hostage. (However, the attempt collapsed 18 hours later.)

In 1992, the XVI Winter Olympic Games ended in Albertville, France.

Ten years ago: Defense Secretary Robert Gates and other U.S. officials held daylong meetings with Australian leaders in Canberra. 

Five years ago: Some 30 NASCAR fans were injured when rookie Kyle Larson’s car was propelled by a crash into the fence at Daytona International Speedway, and large chunks of debris flew into the grandstands.

Five years ago: The Ultimate Fighting Championship held its first women’s bout as Ronda Rousey beat Liz Carmouche on an armbar, her signature move, with 11 seconds left in the first round of their bantamweight title fight at UFC 157 in Anaheim, California.

One year ago: Seeking to tamp down growing unease in Latin America, U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly pledged during a visit to Mexico City that the United States would not enlist its military to enforce immigration laws and that there would be “no mass deportations.”